ADAPTIVE STREET AND GROUND FIGHTING SELF DEFENSE AND INTERNAL MARTIAL ARTS

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"[This] is a thinking person's art,
integrating the most important internal features AND realistic self-defense applications."

***A READER'S RESPONSE TO NEWSLETTER #264,
"HOW TO GET AS GOOD AS YOU CAN AS FAST AS YOU CAN"
[Bolded emphases added by us]
"Hi: Just a quick note to say that this piece is damn well written, enough so to completely differentiate you from everyone else writing/teaching.

It's unfortunate that many readers don't seem to get it, based upon the hostile comments I've seen online about GC, from those who consider themselves to be learned martial artists.

I spent years as the "bad boy" in the dojo, asking too many questions, convinced that there was a better, smarter, faster approach to self-defense learning. GC showed me I was right; whatever merits there are to conventional arts, there are holes in the learning methods conspicuous enough to require students who want to subordinate themselves, to wear costumes and shout in foreign languages, and to have faith in a gospel rather than take responsibility for their own learning. In contrast,
GC is a thinking person's art, integrating the most important internal features AND realistic self-defense applications.


Your emerging principle of adaptability is really useful, though perhaps hard to grasp. Conventionalists remain enamored with gross displays of striking power, failing to see that once your power exceeds what it takes to KO an attacker, it is little more than a liability (ethically and legally.) Real power is found in the spontaneous ability to ADAPT to random stimuli, to flow, to replace yourself (from your feet) in space so as to neutralize size/conventional power.
This understanding results in a training style so much more rewarding than memorizing bullshit techniques that don't work anyway!


Another way that guided chaos departs from all conventional arts is your open acknowledgement of one's fear response. Standard arts operate with the implicit assumption that there IS NO fear in a real attack which of course is nonsense. Thus students never confront their fear and spend a lot of time hiding from it. But fear is little more than "frozen chi," and
GC teaches you to befriend your fear response and to convert it into a martial resource. There is more value to this approach (martially and humanly) than can possibly be expressed through words.

[The "Fear Meditation Drill" and related exercises can be found on the Attackproof Companion Part 1 DVD or ON DEMAND Download --ed.]

I repeat: I have never seen another art that deals with this fundamental human matter straight on, converting a liability into an asset.

I could go on and on but don't want this to be too long, so one last thing: the value of the wobble board. You recommended it in "Attackproof" but my initial response was "yeah, yeah..." and I procrastinated for months. But when I finally made my board and started working on it I was amazed at the results. It's something that can't be verbalized because it has nothing to do with words or your mind. But it's as if through wobble board training your feet can achieve a Bachelor's degree, then a masters, and then a PHD. You develop not just hyper-balance but also this fantastic sensitivity in your feet (and ankles): toes, ball of feet, heels, inner foot, outer foot - all come alive and integrate with relaxed, unified body.
[A complete program of dynamic balance drills can be found on the Attackproof Companion Part 2 and Combat Conditioning DVDs and also  ON DEMAND Downloads. --ed.]

(I might disclose in this context that I am now 62. Ever wonder why you see old people stumbling around? The bad news is that changes happen in your brain as you age, changes which erode your natural balance. I started to experience this in my mid-fifties, stumbling here and there, and then I started the wobble board training. Now I have funky balance and a trained hyper-balance at the same time! What this means is that I lose my balance often, but just for a micro-second, and then through root sensitivity and body unity I instantly regain my balance. Believe me, this is a WONDERFUL experience. And it is a great example of intelligent training that provides value to your daily life, regardless of whether you ever have to defend yourself.)

The result is an increased ability to strike with cat-like power in any direction. Try doing the "Anywhere Striking" drill
on the wobble board [found on the Attackproof Companion Part 1 DVD or ON DEMAND Download --ed.] and with time you'll see what I mean. I should say that though I had trained earnestly in martial arts for more than 20 years, I got a major jump in my ability from just two months of training on the board, for as little as 10 minutes a day.

Sorry if I've written too long here, but you can probably hear that I'm appreciative of what your work has contributed to my life. So thanks again and good luck in sharing this intelligence with the world!"

--
James Ludwig trained extensively in aikido but abandoned the testing process at the first kyu level because it was hampering his martial development. Instead, Ludwig worked "off mat" with high ranking aikido and bagua artists in a free-form style, dumping conventional choreography and technique memorization. Subsequently he has also trained with practitioners of various arts/sports - BJJ, muay thai, boxing, wing chun. Ludwig has used the art of Guided Chaos to inform, validate, and organize his training practice and to maximize internal skills within the context of street-realistic self-defense.
UPDATE:
"I drove up to Elmsford from Philadelphia this past weekend.  I admit that it's a long ride, but on a Saturday you can participate in three hours of training, which makes the ride worth it.  Even better, the teachers didn't insist I go through months of memorizing their basics; instead, with a concise orientation from Matt Kovsky I was cut loose to do contact flow with a range of students/teachers. If you want to see what you're worth, this is the place to do it. Highly intensive random and intelligent martial stimuli coming at you, and you get to see how well you adapt.  You can go slow or fast (both are good), mix it up as much as you wish, all safe. You might get humbled but you won't get bullied.

I can't emphasize enough for beginners: Spending months/years memorizing a bunch of forms is NOT the way to martial competence.  The fastest way is finding a safe, intensive free form practice where you get to train with people more experienced than you who will teach you without injuring you. This is exactly what this school provides to artists smart enough to make the ride.

In between such sessions you can get some personal feedback from John Perkins himself.  Frankly, I'm puzzled that more serious martial artists aren't taking advantage of the value that guided chaos provides right here in New York City's own backyard."