ADAPTIVE STREET AND GROUND FIGHTING SELF DEFENSE AND INTERNAL MARTIAL ARTS

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 MARTIAL ART / SELF DEFENSE STYLE COMPARISON CHART
"What's the best martial art system for me?"
**NOTE: Every school is unique and may teach differently regardless of what is typical or currently popular for a particular style!
GC: The Road Less Traveled

 ATTRIBUTE
 ADVANTAGE  DISADVANTAGE  EMPHASIZED IN GUIDED CHAOS?
 EMPHASIZED IN OTHER ARTS?




Forms ("kata", etc.) training



Increases discipline, tradition, concentration, athletic condition, memorization of specific techniques
Programs your nervous system to react roboticly to true chaotic violence with patterned responses ("the way you train is the way you fight") resulting in freeze ups and inappropriate defense/offense for any given moment





Never





Most
 Closed fist strikes (excluding hammerfists)
Breaks bones, crushes soft tissue
Inadequate vs large attackers, can cause injury to hand when striking large bones, skull, requires perfect form or risks wrist injuries
Some, where appropriate
Most
Open hand strikes
Breaks bones, crushes soft tissue; safe for hitting large bones, skull; greater defensive sensitivity; penetrates enemy defenses better None
 Absolutely Some
Ripping, tearing, shredding, gouging strikes
Easily applied, almost impossible to defend
None offensively. Requires special training to defend AGAINST Absolutely
Offensively: few.
Defense against: none that we know of.
Head butts, biting
 Easily applied, difficult to defend Head butting is usually taught incorrectly in many arts and can hurt you more than the enemy
Absolutely 
Few
Short range low kicking and stomping
Easily applied, almost impossible to defend 
None
Absolutely
Some


Internal or "soft" style techniques
Doesn't require an Olympian's body to work. Virtually only way to defeat a much larger, stronger, skilled enemy
Almost never taught as pure combat anymore. Practitioners often divorced from true forensic reality of violence
Absolutely, but taught differently from traditional "soft" internal styles such as aikido, tai chi, bagua, hsing i


see note on left


External or "hard" style techniques

Rewards those with superior physical attributes with limited increases in hitting power
Less useful for smaller, weaker individuals and exposes them to more danger. External training often decreases balance, sensitivity,  looseness and adaptivity.
Guided Chaos teaches you to be 99% soft (yin) and only 1% hard (yang) at the moment you make impact then become soft (unavailable) again.


Hard styles make up the majority of martial arts systems in the world.
Intensive balance training
Hit, defend, counter-attack, survive and recover during wild fighting
Must be taught dynamically and appropriately to the chaos of combat
 Absolutely Virtually none that we know
Body unity training for power
Utilize full plyometric power of entire body mass and strength while maintaining looseness
If taught incorrectly creates, tight, slow, weak and clumsy responses
 Absolutely In some internal arts, usually incorrectly within a patterned form with no chaotic combat application
Looseness training to avoid and survive impacts, find openings
Ability to keep on fighting and go home
None
 Absolutely Virtually none that we know of; sometimes in boxers, wrestlers and internal styles, usually misdirected and incompletely
Sensitivity training
Ability to sense openings and incoming attacks before your eyes can
None
 Absolutely Supposed to be taught in internal styles, almost always incorrectly. Sometimes found in elite grapplers
Awareness and fear-focusing training
Avoid violence before it happens; channel adrenaline
Can create rigidity and paranoia if done improperly

Absolutely

Some



Modified Native American
groundfighting
(Guided Chaos Groundfighting)
You never know if you'll end up on the ground; allows you to strike and remain free of entanglement. No relation to MMA or submission grappling
None. Difficult for BJJ, MMA practitioners to learn since they are usually taught: 1-sportively with rules to "win" instead of disable and escape.
2-continuous entanglement with bigger, stronger enemies;
also makes you vulnerable to multiple attackers






Absolutely






Virtually none that we know



Knife, stick and gun fighting



A supreme advantage--maybe
Knife and stick usually taught with complex, flowery flourishes incompatible with life-and-death combat. 99% of gun fighting taught unrealistically as depicted in movies & TV. Disarms taught are usually nonsense.




Absolutely



Virtually none that we know





Proven in War
(True WWII Combatives)
Basic, quick striking methodology used in thousands of bloody, documented engagements in World War II by U.S. soldiers. Simple, practical, no-nonsense, reality based, survival techniques for ending a fight and going home


Politically incorrect. Popularly taught today in watered-down, emasculated versions bearing little resemblance to the original.







Absolutely






A few, if that


Total Adaptivity, Improvisation and Spontaneity in the face of
Real Violence

Real violence is chaos and constantly changes. No two fights look exactly the same. What happens if your counter-attack doesn't work? You need to adapt to survive.




Almost impossible to learn with traditional martial art/self-defense teaching methods.





That's all we do!
None that we know of as standard practice. Sometimes acquired by elite, super-trained individuals who are able to dissolve everything they've ever learned into fluid, spontaneous responses.

Thanks to Stefan for the idea.