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HOW DROPPING AND ALIGNMENT CAN STOP
AN INCOMING PUNCH FROM A
6' 4", 366 POUND BOUNCER DEAD IN ITS TRACKS


by John Perkins

Something that is not often given enough emphasis in KCD is the proper way to line up

and either push, stop or strike an opponent. Here I will talk about stopping and
incoming strike.

 During a training session I was working with Raphael, a 6'4" 366 pound night club
security specialist who was a college football player. He was well versed in boxing and
the practical application of jiu jitsu. He could run 40 yards in 4.8 seconds in college a
few years back. His hands were a blur of punches whenever he wanted to display fast
fighting. His kicks were like sledge hammers. His take downs were slick and nearly
unreadable. Raphael wanted to basically know two things. One was how to deal with a man
his size or larger by using more power than he already had and how to manipulate a
smaller person without serious harm at high speed.

 This kind of training takes time and the end result is not only raw power but a finesse
that is rare to say the least. An entire book could be written just on these ideas alone.
In fact, one already has. It is titled ATTACK PROOF.

 I will not go into the details of his training at this time. What I really wanted to
tell you about is the results of proper line-up behind stopping an incoming strike and
how to train for this.

 While training at extremely high speed Raphael sent me a combination of strikes which
had good balance, timing and focus behind them. At the next execution of combined punches
I was stepping slightly to my left and nearly walked face first into an incoming right
punch. Since my subconscious knew that this punch was potentially life threatening, a
trained reflex reaction took over. My left hand intercepted the punch and the force
nearly put Raphael's shoulder out of the socket. His arm dropped like a stone and he
stepped back to prevent further injury.

 Now you might think or say, "How did a far smaller opponent stop such a large and easily
more powerful puncher from not only landing such a punch but cause such a traumatic
effect?"

 The answer is effective line-up with the use of dropping force.

 As my left hand came up to stop the punch my entire bodyweight dropped over my extended
left foot. This was not a deflection. This was a dead stop. All of the energy that was being
released by Raphael and the energy involved in my interception came together at the apex
of interception. The speed of my rooting with the simultaneous slap of the incoming fist
enabled me to transfer the energy into the fist slightly to the pinky side which, in
actuality, caused a very slight, nearly imperceptible, deflection which met the hand and
entire arm at the exact location which caused Rapahel's arm to rebound back up into the
shoulder causing a near dislocation.

 The combination of slam bag training along with drop slap training against a heavy bag
allowed for this to happen. It was not accidental. This is something that I practice on
students and sparring practice opponents often. The difference is that I don't hit with
serious intention while training unless, as in this case, something goes amiss and a
split second correction takes place.

 The slam bag training develops the hand to withstand tremendous force without
shattering. The drop slap against a heavy bag that is driven toward you by an assistant
allows you to place all of your energy into a small concentrated area. The slam bag and
the heavy bag give you instant feedback which tells you if you are on or off.

 The slam bag should stop in mid air and feel like it is solid as a rock upon your
slamming your hand into the bag whether thrown by a partner or simply stepped into as you
toss it in front of you.

 The heavy bag should dent deeply when you apply your hand into it as it moves toward
you. You should not move back at all.

 It is very advantageous to perform both the slam bag training and the heavy bag training
while standing on a wobble board. Here the rule of not falling backward or fallin off at
all is imperative.

 The drop slap can also be used as an effective strike. If applied to the head it will
usually have a profound effect. It has a far greater potential to cause a knock out than
a punch. Against a charging opponent it can stop him in his tracks and depending on where
you apply it can cause serious internal injury.

 The drop slap is a formidable yang tool which should be cultivated by all KCD students.
It can start as something which is explosive and obvious to a very subtle almost
invisible strike that when applied often seems to be a put on, espedially when the
opponent drops to the ground or is sent back flying as if pulled by invisible strings.